Circle The Wagons Bills Fans

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Apr 8

" I’m going to go out and prove they made a mistake and this is a great decision for the Buffalo Bills "


- Bills WR Mike Williams,

Apr 8
kickoffcoverage:

WR Williams seeks fresh start in return to Buffalo:
Wide receiver Mike Williams acknowledged he has some growing up to do while addressing questions about his troubled past Monday.
For Williams, there’s no place better to start fresh than in his hometown of Buffalo.
"It’s like being drafted all over, especially to my hometown, and get to come back and play in front of the people that know me, where I came from," Williams said via the team’s official website during a news conference three days after the Bills acquired him in a trade with Tampa Bay. "The people know what type of guy I am."
Calling the homecoming “a dream come true,” Williams returns to the place he was a high school star. He went on to a successful yet troubled career at Syracuse, where Williams abruptly quit the team in November 2009 during his junior season.
This is the second — and potentially final — chance for Williams to put behind off-field distractions, which led to the Buccaneers parting ways with their starter in exchange for a sixth-round draft pick. The deal was made a year after Williams signed a six-year, $40 million contract.
The breaking point came two weeks ago, when Williams was allegedly stabbed in the leg by his brother, Eric Baylor, who has since turned himself in to police.
Williams passed his physical in Buffalo and said the injury from the stabbing won’t prevent him from reporting for voluntary team workouts, which begin April 22.
Williams acknowledged making mistakes and vows to do better, saying there are people depending upon him, including his infant son.
"When you get a lot of bad attention or bad this, or bad that, it’s about: Are you going to let the bad attack you? Are you going to fall?" Williams said. "Or are you going to get up and try again? That’s why I think a fresh start is needed."
On the field, Williams has displayed the potential as a No. 1 receiver.
A fourth-round draft pick in 2010, Williams led NFL rookies with 65 catches for 964 yards and 11 touchdowns. Though a hamstring injury limited Williams to just six games last year, he has 215 catches for 2,947 yards and 25 touchdowns in 54 career games.
The Bills are in need of an experienced player to complement returning starter Stevie Johnson, who led an otherwise young group of receivers.
It’s off the field where questions have arisen.
The Tampa Bay Times has reported that Williams’ neighbors in Tampa were unhappy with noise issues and damage to the player’s rented home.
Without providing specifics, Williams said two of the numerous accusations were made up. When pressed on which two, Williams said the Bills requested that he not discuss it.
In trading Williams, Buccaneers general manager Jason Licht referred to the deal as something the team “felt was best for both sides.”
In Buffalo, coach Doug Marrone is willing to provide Williams the benefit of the doubt. Marrone was in his first season at Syracuse when Williams left the team.
Marrone signed off on the trade by saying what happened at Syracuse “is in the past for both of us.” Marrone went further by picking up Williams at the airport upon the player’s arrival in Buffalo.
Williams said he and Marrone cleared the air by speaking on the phone before the trade was completed.
"He made mistakes. I made mistakes," Williams said. "The situation wasn’t handled how it was supposed to be handled. But the past is the past. So we’re kind of looking forward."
Williams acknowledged that one of Marrone’s concerns at Syracuse was the player skipping classes.
That won’t be an issue now.
"He didn’t think I went to class. But since it’s the pros, he knows I’m going to go out there and do my job on the field," Williams said. "You’re always going to get the great Mike on the field." (Photo: Brian Blanco/Associated Press)

kickoffcoverage:

WR Williams seeks fresh start in return to Buffalo:

Wide receiver Mike Williams acknowledged he has some growing up to do while addressing questions about his troubled past Monday.

For Williams, there’s no place better to start fresh than in his hometown of Buffalo.

"It’s like being drafted all over, especially to my hometown, and get to come back and play in front of the people that know me, where I came from," Williams said via the team’s official website during a news conference three days after the Bills acquired him in a trade with Tampa Bay. "The people know what type of guy I am."

Calling the homecoming “a dream come true,” Williams returns to the place he was a high school star. He went on to a successful yet troubled career at Syracuse, where Williams abruptly quit the team in November 2009 during his junior season.

This is the second — and potentially final — chance for Williams to put behind off-field distractions, which led to the Buccaneers parting ways with their starter in exchange for a sixth-round draft pick. The deal was made a year after Williams signed a six-year, $40 million contract.

The breaking point came two weeks ago, when Williams was allegedly stabbed in the leg by his brother, Eric Baylor, who has since turned himself in to police.

Williams passed his physical in Buffalo and said the injury from the stabbing won’t prevent him from reporting for voluntary team workouts, which begin April 22.

Williams acknowledged making mistakes and vows to do better, saying there are people depending upon him, including his infant son.

"When you get a lot of bad attention or bad this, or bad that, it’s about: Are you going to let the bad attack you? Are you going to fall?" Williams said. "Or are you going to get up and try again? That’s why I think a fresh start is needed."

On the field, Williams has displayed the potential as a No. 1 receiver.

A fourth-round draft pick in 2010, Williams led NFL rookies with 65 catches for 964 yards and 11 touchdowns. Though a hamstring injury limited Williams to just six games last year, he has 215 catches for 2,947 yards and 25 touchdowns in 54 career games.

The Bills are in need of an experienced player to complement returning starter Stevie Johnson, who led an otherwise young group of receivers.

It’s off the field where questions have arisen.

The Tampa Bay Times has reported that Williams’ neighbors in Tampa were unhappy with noise issues and damage to the player’s rented home.

Without providing specifics, Williams said two of the numerous accusations were made up. When pressed on which two, Williams said the Bills requested that he not discuss it.

In trading Williams, Buccaneers general manager Jason Licht referred to the deal as something the team “felt was best for both sides.”

In Buffalo, coach Doug Marrone is willing to provide Williams the benefit of the doubt. Marrone was in his first season at Syracuse when Williams left the team.

Marrone signed off on the trade by saying what happened at Syracuse “is in the past for both of us.” Marrone went further by picking up Williams at the airport upon the player’s arrival in Buffalo.

Williams said he and Marrone cleared the air by speaking on the phone before the trade was completed.

"He made mistakes. I made mistakes," Williams said. "The situation wasn’t handled how it was supposed to be handled. But the past is the past. So we’re kind of looking forward."

Williams acknowledged that one of Marrone’s concerns at Syracuse was the player skipping classes.

That won’t be an issue now.

"He didn’t think I went to class. But since it’s the pros, he knows I’m going to go out there and do my job on the field," Williams said. "You’re always going to get the great Mike on the field." (Photo: Brian Blanco/Associated Press)

Apr 6

The candidates / Possible suitors for the Buffalo Bills via The Buffalo News

000gooby:

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TERRY Pegula

Age: 63

Net worth: $3.3 billion

How wealth acquired: Oil and gas drilling.

Reasons to buy: Owns Buffalo Sabres, which he bought in 2011 for $189 million. He sold his company, East Resources, for $4.7 billion in 2010 and is making major investment in downtown Buffalo with $170 million HarborCenter complex next to First Niagara Center. He has more wealth than 28 current NFL owners, according to Forbes magazine.

Reasons not to buy: More passionate about hockey; focused on rebuilding Sabres team that is last in the NHL.

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B. Thomas Golisano

Age: 72

Net worth: $2.1 billion

How wealth acquired: Founded Paychex, a payroll-processing company based in Rochester.

Reasons to buy: Sold Buffalo Sabres to Pegula in 2011, reportedly rejecting a higher offer from someone who planned to move it to another city. He also has expressed concern about the Bills leaving. “I have made the commitment that if that likelihood appears to be happening, I will try and get involved and see what I can do to prevent it,” he said in a 2011 interview.

Reasons not to buy: Moved to Florida in 2009, saying New York’s taxes were too high.

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Jeremy Jacobs Sr.

Age: 74

Net worth: $3.1 billion

How wealth acquired: Owner of Buffalo-based Delaware North, one of the world’s largest concession companies.

Reasons to buy: Has deep Buffalo roots and has shown interest before in owning an NFL franchise.

Reasons not to buy: Already owns Boston Bruins. NFL rules prohibit an owner from owning a team in another sport if they are in different markets. So the Bruins would need to be sold or some of his family would need to divest themselves from the Bruins and take over the Bills. Has publicly balked at costs of NFL ownership.

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Robert Rich Jr.

Age: 73

Net worth: $3 billion

How wealth acquired: Owner of Buffalo-based Rich Products, frozen food company founded in 1945 by Robert Rich Sr.

Reasons to buy: Has deep Buffalo roots and pushed to bring an expansion Major League Baseball team to Buffalo in 1980s.

Reasons not to buy: Hasn’t publicly expressed interest in owning the Bills.

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Donald J. Trump

Age: 67

Net worth: Varying reports ranging from $150 million to $7 billion.

How wealth acquired: Vast holdings in real estate, finance, entertainment, golf, apparel, television, and vodka, among other ventures. Began his career at his father’s company.

Reasons to buy: Has expressed keen interest in keeping the Bills in Buffalo.

Reasons not to buy: Has expressed none, while a spokesman says Trump has the financial ability to outbid other suitors.

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Jeffrey E. Gundlach

Age: Mid-50s

Net worth: Possibly more than $1 billion

How wealth acquired: Bond investor is founder and chief executive officer of DoubleLine Capital.

Reasons to buy: Grew up in Buffalo as a Bills fan. In 2011, he told the Wall Street Journal he was trying to put together a group to purchase the Bills. “It’s not an investment. It’s because I love the Bills,” he said. He told the Los Angeles Times it would be “a tragedy” if the team moved.

Reasons not to buy: It might be difficult to run a football team in Buffalo while leading a major mutual fund company in California.

Apr 4
sportstalkflorida:

Tampa Bay Buccaneers Trade Mike Williams to the Bills
The Tampa Bay Buccaneers have traded wide receiver Mike Williams to the Buffalo Bills in exchange for a sixth-round draft pick, Sports Talk Florida has learned.

sportstalkflorida:

Tampa Bay Buccaneers Trade Mike Williams to the Bills

The Tampa Bay Buccaneers have traded wide receiver Mike Williams to the Buffalo Bills in exchange for a sixth-round draft pick, Sports Talk Florida has learned.

Apr 3
rctheinscriber:

Buffalo Bills: Could Donald Trump Really Buy the Team?
According to reports from ESPN.com, a group of investors recently approached Donald Trump to gauge his interest in purchasing the Buffalo Bills.

rctheinscriber:

Buffalo Bills: Could Donald Trump Really Buy the Team?

According to reports from ESPN.com, a group of investors recently approached Donald Trump to gauge his interest in purchasing the Buffalo Bills.

kickoffcoverage:

Bills will remain in Buffalo following Ralph Wilson’s death:
Ralph Wilson fulfilled his vow in keeping the Bills in Buffalo during his lifetime.
Though they won’t be leaving any time soon following the 95-year-old Pro Football Hall of Fame owner’s death, their long-term future is in question.
The Bills are essentially locked in to playing at Ralph Wilson Stadium through the next six years. That’s because of a non-relocation provision included in the team’s lease agreement that would require the Bills to pay a $400 million penalty if they leave before the 2019 season.
"Anyone expecting to see the Los Angeles Bills is sorely mistaken," SportsCorp President Marc Ganis said during a phone interview. "They can’t move even if they wanted to. It would go against the ironclad agreement done with Ralph’s blessing."
Ganis, a close observer of the NFL, heads a Chicago-based consulting firm and is very familiar with the 10-year lease the Bills negotiated with state and county governments in December 2012.
"With that lease, Ralph gave away hundreds of millions of dollars as, in essence, a parting gift to Buffalo," Ganis said.
While it looks highly unlikely any potential owner would try to break the lease, nothing is impossible. And as for what happens beyond 2019 is uncertain and largely dependent on the next owner. In 2020, the Bills have a one-time opportunity to opt out of the lease for $28.4 million.
Wilson, the team’s founder and sole owner, died on Tuesday and is survived by wife Mary and two daughters. Wilson, however, expressed no interest of leaving the team to his family.
As a result, the original American Football League franchise is expected to be placed into a trust overseen by the executors of Wilson’s estate before being put up for sale. That opens the potential of the team being sold and relocated.
Los Angeles could be a landing spot. So would Toronto, where the Bills played annual regular-season games since 2008 before postponing their series last month.
A list of ownership candidates has emerged to purchase a franchise valued at around $870 million.
Some of the interested parties include:
Bills’ Hall of Fame quarterback Jim Kelly, who has made no secret that he has put together a group of investors to buy the team. Kelly’s health, however, has become an issue. The 54-year-old is preparing to undergo chemotherapy and radiation treatment following a recurrence of cancer.
California-based bond fund manager Jeffrey Gundlach expressed interest in buying the Bills three years ago. Gundlach, who founded DoubleLine Capital, is a Bills fan and has ties to Buffalo.
Two Toronto-based groups — Maple Leafs Sports and Entertainment and Rogers Communications — have been mentioned as groups interested in buying the Bills with the intention of relocating them north of the border.
New Jersey rocker Jon Bon Jovi is very interested in becoming an NFL owner. And NHL owners Jeremy Jacobs, who owns the Boston Bruins, and Buffalo Sabres owner Terry Pegula have both expressed interest in becoming NFL owners. (Photo: Don Heupel/Associated Press)

kickoffcoverage:

Bills will remain in Buffalo following Ralph Wilson’s death:

Ralph Wilson fulfilled his vow in keeping the Bills in Buffalo during his lifetime.

Though they won’t be leaving any time soon following the 95-year-old Pro Football Hall of Fame owner’s death, their long-term future is in question.

The Bills are essentially locked in to playing at Ralph Wilson Stadium through the next six years. That’s because of a non-relocation provision included in the team’s lease agreement that would require the Bills to pay a $400 million penalty if they leave before the 2019 season.

"Anyone expecting to see the Los Angeles Bills is sorely mistaken," SportsCorp President Marc Ganis said during a phone interview. "They can’t move even if they wanted to. It would go against the ironclad agreement done with Ralph’s blessing."

Ganis, a close observer of the NFL, heads a Chicago-based consulting firm and is very familiar with the 10-year lease the Bills negotiated with state and county governments in December 2012.

"With that lease, Ralph gave away hundreds of millions of dollars as, in essence, a parting gift to Buffalo," Ganis said.

While it looks highly unlikely any potential owner would try to break the lease, nothing is impossible. And as for what happens beyond 2019 is uncertain and largely dependent on the next owner. In 2020, the Bills have a one-time opportunity to opt out of the lease for $28.4 million.

Wilson, the team’s founder and sole owner, died on Tuesday and is survived by wife Mary and two daughters. Wilson, however, expressed no interest of leaving the team to his family.

As a result, the original American Football League franchise is expected to be placed into a trust overseen by the executors of Wilson’s estate before being put up for sale. That opens the potential of the team being sold and relocated.

Los Angeles could be a landing spot. So would Toronto, where the Bills played annual regular-season games since 2008 before postponing their series last month.

A list of ownership candidates has emerged to purchase a franchise valued at around $870 million.

Some of the interested parties include:

Bills’ Hall of Fame quarterback Jim Kelly, who has made no secret that he has put together a group of investors to buy the team. Kelly’s health, however, has become an issue. The 54-year-old is preparing to undergo chemotherapy and radiation treatment following a recurrence of cancer.

California-based bond fund manager Jeffrey Gundlach expressed interest in buying the Bills three years ago. Gundlach, who founded DoubleLine Capital, is a Bills fan and has ties to Buffalo.

Two Toronto-based groups — Maple Leafs Sports and Entertainment and Rogers Communications — have been mentioned as groups interested in buying the Bills with the intention of relocating them north of the border.

New Jersey rocker Jon Bon Jovi is very interested in becoming an NFL owner. And NHL owners Jeremy Jacobs, who owns the Boston Bruins, and Buffalo Sabres owner Terry Pegula have both expressed interest in becoming NFL owners. (Photo: Don Heupel/Associated Press)

kickoffcoverage:

Bills, Steelers ask NFL to approve joint practices:
The Buffalo Bills and the Pittsburgh Steelers have asked the NFL to approve joint practice sessions during training camp this season and next year.
Buffalo coach Doug Marrone said holding practices against another team is something he’s done in the past and “truly believes in.”
The Steelers would host the Bills this summer at Saint Vincent College in Latrobe, Pa., then would visit the Bills’ camp at St. John Fisher College outside Rochester, N.Y. in 2015. The Steelers held joint training camp practices with the Washington Redskins in the 1980s and 1990s.
Marrone said he thinks the practices could provide “a good working relationship for both teams.”
The exact dates will be determined after the NFL preseason schedule is release. (Photo: Associated Press)

kickoffcoverage:

Bills, Steelers ask NFL to approve joint practices:

The Buffalo Bills and the Pittsburgh Steelers have asked the NFL to approve joint practice sessions during training camp this season and next year.

Buffalo coach Doug Marrone said holding practices against another team is something he’s done in the past and “truly believes in.”

The Steelers would host the Bills this summer at Saint Vincent College in Latrobe, Pa., then would visit the Bills’ camp at St. John Fisher College outside Rochester, N.Y. in 2015. The Steelers held joint training camp practices with the Washington Redskins in the 1980s and 1990s.

Marrone said he thinks the practices could provide “a good working relationship for both teams.”

The exact dates will be determined after the NFL preseason schedule is release. (Photo: Associated Press)

kickoffcoverage:

The Buffalo Bills continue to leave one light on at Ralph Wilson Stadium in memory of founder and owner Ralph Wilson who passed away Tuesday at the age of 95. ‪#‎Respect‬

kickoffcoverage:

The Buffalo Bills continue to leave one light on at Ralph Wilson Stadium in memory of founder and owner Ralph Wilson who passed away Tuesday at the age of 95. ‪#‎Respect‬

kickoffcoverage:

Bills fans to hold tailgate party in owner’s honor:
A Buffalo Bills fan club is planning a tailgate party near the Buffalo Bills stadium to honor the late team owner Ralph Wilson.
Just hours after the team said the 95-year-old Wilson had died at his Michigan home Tuesday, the Bills Mafia fan club announced on Twitter that it would hold a memorial tailgate at a privately-owned parking lot just down the street from Ralph Wilson Stadium.
The group says Bills fans want to say thank you to Wilson the best way they know, with a tailgate party.
The event will start at 1 p.m. Sunday. Parking will cost $10, with all proceeds to be donated to the Hunter’s Hope Foundation. The foundation is named for the late Hunter Kelly, son of former Bills quarterback and Hall of Famer Jim Kelly. (Photo: Getty Images)

kickoffcoverage:

Bills fans to hold tailgate party in owner’s honor:

A Buffalo Bills fan club is planning a tailgate party near the Buffalo Bills stadium to honor the late team owner Ralph Wilson.

Just hours after the team said the 95-year-old Wilson had died at his Michigan home Tuesday, the Bills Mafia fan club announced on Twitter that it would hold a memorial tailgate at a privately-owned parking lot just down the street from Ralph Wilson Stadium.

The group says Bills fans want to say thank you to Wilson the best way they know, with a tailgate party.

The event will start at 1 p.m. Sunday. Parking will cost $10, with all proceeds to be donated to the Hunter’s Hope Foundation. The foundation is named for the late Hunter Kelly, son of former Bills quarterback and Hall of Famer Jim Kelly. (Photo: Getty Images)